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Diverse ways of celebrating Navaratri in a diverse India

Navaratri is a festival dedicated to the worship of the Hindu deity Durga. The word Navaratri means ‘nine nights’ in Sanskrit; nava meaning nine and ratri meaning nights. During these nine nights and ten days, nine forms of Shakti/Devi are worshiped. The tenth day is commonly referred to as Vijayadashami or “Dussehra” (also spelled Dasara). Navaratri represents a celebration of the Goddess Amba, (the Power) and is celebrated in a large number of Indian communities. The mother goddess is said to appear in 9 forms, and each one is worshiped for a day. These nine forms signify various traits that the goddess influences us with. The Devi Mahatmya and other texts invoking the Goddess who vanquished demons are cited. Diwali the festival of lights is celebrated twenty days after Dussehra. During this vowed religious observance, a pot is installed (ghatasthapana) at a sanctified place at home. A lamp is kept lit in the pot for nine days. The pot symbolizes the universe. The uninterrupted lit lamp is the medium through which we worship the effulgent Adishakti, i.e. Sree Durgadevi. During Navaratri, the principle of Sree Durgadevi is more active in the atmosphere. This festival corresponds to a nine-day Taoist celebration beginning on the eve of 9th lunar month of the Chinese calendar, which is observed primarily by the ethnic Chinese of Min Nan linguistic group in Southeast Asian countries like Myanmar, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand and also the Riau Islands called the Nine Emperor Gods Festival.wallpaper durga puja wallpaper bhavya roop maa durga

The beginning of spring and the beginning of autumn are considered to be important junctions of climatic and solar influences. These two periods are taken as sacred opportunities for the worship of the Divine Mother Durga. The dates of the festival are determined according to the lunar calendar. Navaratri is celebrated five times a year. They are Vasanta Navaratri, Ashadha Navaratri, the Sharad Navaratri, and the Paush/Magha Navaratri. Of these, the Sharad Navaratri of the month of Puratashi and the Vasanta Navaratri of the Vasanta kala are the most important. Other two are observed by Shaktas only. The Chaitra Navaratri culminates in Ram Navami and the Sharad Navaratri culminates in Durga Puja and Dussehra.

North India

Navaratri is celebrated in different ways throughout India. In North India, all three Navaratri are celebrated with much fervor by fasting on all nine days and worshiping the Mother Goddess in her different forms. The Dussehra of Kullu in Himachal Pradesh is particularly famous in the North. In North India, as the culmination of the Ramlila which is enacted ceremoniously during Dussehra, the effigies of Ravana, Kumbhakarna, and Meghanada are burnt to celebrate the victory of good (Rama) over evil forces on the ‘Vijaya Dashami’ day.

Eastern India

The last four days of Sharad Navaratri take on a particularly dramatic form in the states of West Bengal and Odisha in Eastern India where they are cdurga pujaelebrated as Durga Puja. Eighth day is traditionally Durgashtami which is big in Bengal, Odisha and Bihar. This is the biggest festival of the year in these states. Exquisitely crafted and decorated life-size clay idols of the Goddess Durga depicting her slaying the demon Mahishasura are set up in temples and other places. These idols are then worshiped for five days and immersed in the river on the fifth day.

Western India

In Western India, particularly in the state of Gujarat and Mumbai, Navaratri is celebrated with the famous Garba and Dandiya-Raas dance. Since the past few years, the Government of Gujarat has been organising the “Navaratri Festival Celebrations” on a regular basis for the nine days of Navaratri Festival in Gujarat. People from all over Gujarat and even abroad come to participate in the nine days celebrations. It is also popular throughout India and among Indian communities around the world including the UK, Canada, Malaysia, Singapore and USA.B_Id_425976_Garba_

In the temples of Goa, on the first day of the seventh month of the Hindu calendar Ashwin, in some temples, a copper pitcher is installed surrounded by clay in which nine varieties of food grains are sown inside the sanctum sanctuary of the temple. All the nine nights are celebrated by presenting devotional songs, and through religious discourses. Later in the night the idol of the goddess is put in a specially-decorated colorful swing and for nine nights, this swing is being swung to the tune of temple music (called as ranavadya) by devotees who throng in large numbers to participate in the festival.

South India

In South India, people set up steps and place idols on them. This is known as golu. Photos of typical golu displayed in Tamil Nadu style can be found here.

In Karnataka, Ayudha Puja, the ninth day of Mysore Dasara, is celebrated with the worship of implements used in daily life such as computers, books, vehicles, or kitchen tools. The effort to see the divine in the tools and objects one uses in daily life is central to this celebration, so it includes all tools that help one earn one’s livelihood. Knowledge workers go for books, pen or computers, farmers go for the plough and other agricultural tools, machinery for industrialists and cars/buses/trucks for the transportation workers—all are decorated with flowers and worshiped on this day invoking God’s blessing for success in coming years. It is believed that any new venture such as starting of business or purchasing of new household items on this day is bound to bring success and prosperity.

Mysore is well known for the festivities that take place during the period of Dasara, the state festival of Karnataka. The Dasara festivities, which are celebrated over a ten-day period, made official festival of the state by Raja Wodeyar I in 1610. On the ninth day of Dasara, called Mahanavami, the royal sword is worshipped and is taken on a procession of decorated elephants, camels and horses. On the tenth day, called Vijayadashami, the traditional Dasara procession (locally known as Jumboo Savari) is held on the streets of Mysore. An image of the Goddess Chamundeshwari is placed on a golden howdah on the back of a decorated elephant and taken on a procession, accompanied by tableaux, dance groups, music bands, decorated elephants, horses and camels.[5] The procession starts from the Mysore Palace and culminates at a place called Bannimantapa, where the banni tree (Prosopis spicigera) is worshipped. The Dasara festivities culminate on the night of Vijayadashami with a torchlight parade, known locally as Panjina Kavayatthu.

In Kerala and some parts of Karnataka, Ashtami, Navami, and Vijaya Dashami of Sharad Navarathri are celebrated as Sarasvati Puja in which books are worshiped. The books are placed for Puja on the Ashtami day in their own houses, traditional nursery schools, or in temples. On Vijaya Dashami day, the books are ceremoniously taken out for reading and writing after worshiping Sarasvati. Vijaya Dashami day is considered auspicious for initiating the children into writing and reading, which is called Vidyarambham. Tens of thousands of children are initiated into the world of letters on this day in Kerala.

In Telangana region of Andhra Pradesh, people c2elebrate Bathukamma festival over a period of nine days. It is a kind of Navaratri celebration. Here Navaratri is divided into sets of three days to adore three different aspects of the supreme goddess or goddesses.

First three days: The goddess is separated a spiritual force called Durga also known as Kali in order to destroy all our evil and grant boons.

Second three days: The Mother is adored as a giver of spiritual wealth, Lakshmi, who is considered to have the power of bestowing on her devotees inexhaustible wealth, as she is the goddess of wealth.

Last three days: The final set of three days is spent in worshiping the goddess of wisdom, Saraswati. In order to have all-round success in life, believers seek the blessings of all three aspects of the divine femininity, hence the nine nights of worship. During the eighth or ninth day, Kanya Puja, pre-pubescent girls are ceremonially worshipped. On the 10th day, the effigy of Ravana is burnt

In some parts of South India, Saraswati puja is performed on the 9th day. Ayudha Puja is conducted in many parts of South India on the Mahanavami (Ninth) day with much fanfare. Weapons, agricultural implements, all kinds of tools, equipment, machinery and automobiles are decorated and worshipped on this day along with the worship of Goddess. The work starts afresh from the next day, i.e. the 10th day which is celebrated as ‘Vijaya Dashami’. Many teachers/schools in south India start teaching Kindergarten children from that day onwards.

During Navaratri, some devotees of Durga observe a fast and prayers are offered for the protection of health and prosperity. Devotees avoid meat, alcoholic drinks, grains, wheat and onion during this fast. Grains are usually avoided since it is believed that during the period of Navaratri and seasonal change, grains attract and absorb lots of negative energies from the surrounding and therefore there is a need to avoid eating anything which is produced from grains for the purification of Navaratri to be successful. Navaratri is also a period of introspection and purification, and is traditionally an auspicious and religious time for starting new ventures.

Trekking Opportunities in Gujarat : Polo Monument and Vijayanagar Forest

Polo Forest is a haven for Eco-friendly nature lovers and the adventurous. Polo-one of the most ancient historical sites in Gujarat, is also unique for its picturesque surroundings, Forest & Mills serving as refuge for fascinating flora & fauna. It is a Bird Watcher’s Delight being a sanctuary for over 200 species of Rare Birds. It also is an abode for Jungle fowl and a host of other species which are yet grimly holding on to this last habitat, thoroughly adorned by flowing rivulets and an unsullied lake. The area is surrounded with archeologically important Shiv Temple at Sarneshwar, Sadevant Savlings Deras, Surya Mandir, Lakhena Temple, Jain derasar, the ancient Polo Jain Nagri.polo-forest-vijaynagarThe Polo Camp site is located in Vijayanagar taluka of Sabarkantha districts and is near to Vanaj Forest area, Harnav River and Damsite. It is 150 km from Ahmedabad and 70 km from Himatnagar. Presently at Polo Campsite, Nature Education Camps, Wild Life training and seminars are organized.

The ancient Polo city, a gateway to Rajasthan, was once used as a hiding place for rulers, concealed from enemies, citizens, angry wives, even from the sun, tucked between sacred hills on the east and west. It was built around the river Harnav, an ancient water body spoken of in the Puranas. It is believed to have been established in the 10th century by the Parihar kings of Idar, and was then conquered in the 15th century by the Rathod Rajputs of Marwar.  The name is derived from pol, the Mapolo_vijyanaga_jaintemple_vijaynagarrwari word for “gate,” signifying its status as a gateway between Gujarat and Rajasthan. It was built between Kalaliyo in the east, the highest peak in the area, and Mamrehchi in the west, considered sacred by the local adivasis.  Together they block sunlight for most of the day, which might provide an explanation for the otherwise mysterious abandonment of the ancient city.

The 400 square km area of dry mixed deciduous forest is most lush between September and December after the monsoon rains when the rivers are full, but at any time of the year it provides a rich wildlife experience. There are more than 450 species of medicinal plants, around 275 of birds, 30 of mammals, and 32 of reptiles. There are bears, panthers, leopards, hyenas, water fowl, raptors, passerines, and flying squirrels (mostly heard, rarely seen), all living under a canopy of diverse plants and trees. During winter, all manner of migratory birds occupy the forest; during the rainy season there are wetland birds

The life of the adivasi settlements are still rooted to the forest, and they sure can teach us a lesson or two in listening to the deep hum of the world that envelops these scattered whispers of human constructions.The fig trees, when in fruit, are good places to look out for the endangered Grey Hornbill and Brown-headed Barbet who will come to nibble. Grey Hornbills can also be found at a Banyan tree near the campsite, when it is out with its bright red fruit. On another tree on the other side of the camp look for woodpeckers, and fruit birds and prey birds at the top, especially during a particular half hour in the afternoon (the exact time of which changes).

Until recently, this area was not well-known, and saw very few visitors. The numbers have increasedpolo-forest2 dramatically in the last few years, thanks to a few individuals working to promote its beauty and the following activities:

  • Trekking on jungle trails alongside the pristine lake and rivulets
  • Climbing mountains over 800 meters height.
  • Exploring 1500 year old ruins
  • Star gazing at night
  • Bird watching, morning short walk in the natural greenery
  • Herbal outings, river swimming

This increased flow comes with a price, however. It is important to remember, as visitors, to approach each destination and its inhabitants, human or otherwise, humbly, openly, and with the awareness that every interaction, no matter how slight, carries its own impact on the area whether we know it or not.

Outdoor Expedition for Students | Photography Tour ~ Fixed Departure 2014

Photography Expedition_Anup Ranta
Outdoor Expedition for Students “An Experience of A Lifetime”

Program Highlights:

  • Learning Photography Techniques by Professional Photographer.
  • Rope Course and Lecture on Outdoor Education by Our Outdoor Expert.
  • Classes of Yoga and Meditation by professional Yoga Teacher.
  • Sightseeing and A Spiritual Tour of Gangotri Temple.
  • Bird watching and Nature walk in Himalaya.
  • Survival Course, Height Gain and Fire Drill.
  • “Clean the Himalaya” Movement in Agoda.
  • Village Attraction & Cultural Exchange.
  • Adventure and outdoor Activities.
  • First Aid Course by Doctors Team.
  • Leanings, Feedback and many more.
  • Trekking and Camping.

Continue reading Outdoor Expedition for Students | Photography Tour ~ Fixed Departure 2014

25 Top Treks in Garhwal Himalayas, Uttarakhand

Garhwal, a region in the Indian state of Uttarakhand is one of the most popular trekking and adventure sports destination in India. It is full of exciting trekking destinations that provides all types of trek routes starting from the easiest to the strenous. The best time to visit Garhwal is in the months of April-June and September-October.

Some of the treks in the Garhwal region are:

Auden Col Trek:Auden Col

  •   Duration: 18 Days
  •   Grade: Challenging – Tough
  •   Altitude: 5450 mts/17876 ft
  •   Season: Mid May to Early October

Auden’s Col, one of the toughest treks in Garhwal that joins the Jogin I and Gangotri III summits on one side and on the other side, it joins two glaciers, one of which is the Khatling. The trek starts from Gangotri and on the way to Nala Camp, you will pass through the pine and birch forests after which there is a day trek to the Rudra Gaira Base Camp that offers an extraordinary view of the snow-clad Himalayas. Gangotri base camp is the next stop and from here begins the way up to the Auden’s Col base camp. The fascinating trek to the Khatling glacier is arduous but well-worth the view. The descent commences after Masar Tal, Vasuki Tal and then end at Kedarnath. Continue reading 25 Top Treks in Garhwal Himalayas, Uttarakhand

List of Top 10 Treks in Upper Himachal Region

Bhabha Pass Trek
bhabha passBhaba pass Trek is an attention grabbing trek, and one of the famous trek tours among the Himachal Trekking expeditions. The pass gets carpeted by snow round the year. After crossing the Bhaba pass, the landscape changes dramatically, thick forest of Pine, cedar and deodar replaces the barren landscape of Spiti. The trail mounts along the left bank of the Wangar River after crossing a footbridge. Then keeps climbing through crop fields of Mastrang and passes through a mixed forest of conifers and temperate broad-leafed species. Travellers go trekking generally between the months of July to September as it is the most pleasant time. This journey is not only adventure centric but also spiritual because it offers a pilgrim trail to all those who are devoted to perform parikrama of the divine mountain range. Continue reading List of Top 10 Treks in Upper Himachal Region

Places to visit near Shikhar Nature Resort, Uttarkashi..!!

Shikhar Nature Resort is a division of Shikhar Travels India Pvt Ltd, one of the leading tour operators based in New Delhi, India. The resort is conveniently located 5 km from Uttarkashi, Uttarakhand on the way to Gangotri. It is a river side resort, perfect for relaxation, family holiday, corporate visits, educational tours and much more.

During your stay at the resort, you can be a part of various adventure/fun activities, you can also grab the opportunity to explore various sightseeing’s and getaways :

VishwanathTemple_24112Vishwanath Temple:

Vishwanath temple is known as the “Kashi of north”, which is ancient and renowned temple in the heart of Himalayan terrain. This temple is devoted to Lord Shiva and is situated at approx. 300 mts away from the local market of Uttarkashi. It was renovated by Maharani Khaneti, wife of Sudarshan Shah in 1857. The main attraction of this temple is the shivling, which is around 60 cm high & 90 cm in circumference. Continue reading Places to visit near Shikhar Nature Resort, Uttarkashi..!!

Tips for your Safety while Trekking!!

altitudeTrekking in the mountains is a rewarding and unforgettable experience. However, it is important to keep your safety in mind. Weather conditions can change any moment and in case of an accident, medical help is not always easily available. Have a look below for some guidelines and tips on health & safety during your trip. Keeping those in mind will also help you to enjoy your trip more! Continue reading Tips for your Safety while Trekking!!

Glacier Treks In The Indian Himalayan Region

The glaciers in the Indian Himalayas have great significance whether it is religious or adventurous. These glaciers turn into different sacred rivers that can be bowed by tremendous devotees. But besides this these glaciers are the perfect way of exploring yourself by digging into different trekking tours in India.

Catch some of the best glacier trekking routes in India that brings energetic and impressive expedition to the great Himalayas.


Gomukh Glacier:

gomukh-glacier Gangotri Gomukh is the origin of the river Ganges and the seat of Goddess Ganga, famously being popular as one of the Chardham circuits in Uttarakhand. Gomukh is one of the holiest places for the Hindu devotees and also brings the great trekking opportunities for the enthusiastic travelers. The trek takes you to Gomukh (cows mouth), the mythological source of the River Ganges, which is at the snout of the Gangotri glacier. The Gomukh Glacier trekking covers the area of the Garhwal Himalayas at an altitude of 4463 mts/4638 ft. The normal duration of Gomukh glacier trekking is about 8-11 days and it brings moderate to challenging kinds of trekking.

The best time for this trekking is May-June & August- November. The trek will give a complete experience, right from self supported journey to camping in deep Himalayas. Continue reading Glacier Treks In The Indian Himalayan Region

Lahaul and Spiti – A Travel Guide

Map-LS-Tourist


1. Baralacha La:
baralachalaSituated at an altitude of 4833 m, the Baralacha La is a mountain pass in the Zanskar Range connecting Lahaul to Ladakh. The pass serves as a natural divide between the Bhaga and Yunam rivers and is near the origination points of the Bhaga River and the Chandra River. The beautiful Saraj Tal Lake is near to the pass and adds to the natural beauty of the place. The pass is the origination point of many trekking expedition around the area and is known for its breathtaking views of the mountains all around. Continue reading Lahaul and Spiti – A Travel Guide

National Parks in Indian Himalayan Region

The Indian Himalayan region is just not a landlocked territory. Rather it secludes a vast ecosphere that stretches from the Indus Valley in Kashmir to valley of Noha-Dihing River in Arunachal Pradesh. The region is the stomping ground of several endangered animals, migratory birds, different types of insects and varied species of plant life. Confined within the hulking high peaks and in its hem, the Indian Himalayan region is proud to ramp up several national parks… being a haven to the Himalayan wildlife. Below is a list of the top 5 national parks in the Indian Himalayan region that may turn your leisure vacation into an adventurous one. Who Knows! When we are in the mountains our mind swings in its multi-layered climatic and altitudinal conditions.


The Great Himalayan National Park:
The-Great-Himalayan-NationaOne of the newly built national parks in India, the Great Himalayan National Park covers an area of approximately 1,171 sq. kilometers that stretches from the Kullu valley floor at 1,500 meters to a mighty elevation of 6000 meters in the state of Himachal Pradesh. In the midst of lush coniferous forests, emerald meadows strewn with exotic flora, soaring snowy peaks and pristine glaciers the Great Himalayan National Park is a home to a several species of wild mountain goats like the bharal, goral and serow, the brown bear and predators like the leopard and the elusive snow leopard. Further, it also houses more than 200 species of birds and other faunal species including insects, amphibians, annelids and mollusks. Continue reading National Parks in Indian Himalayan Region